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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/17/2011 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    When I wrote this album I knew that a lot of this would emerge. The reality is that many are stuck in the past and can’t get beyond what they perceive as what my “sonics” should be. Songwriting is not paint by numbers. My favourite song is Tangled Up In Blue by Bob Dylan - a song of verses, amazing lyrics, but no choruses, and no massive sonic shifts. Storytelling is an art. A Thousand Tons, for example, tells a story, and how it’s musically arranged matches it. Explosions or “big finishes” etc are not the point. The emptiness that it suddenly returns to is the point. The reality is the “typical” course of action is deferred to as “what should be done” rather than attempting to seriously examine how the song imparts a message. I have, over the last few months, contemplated retiring. I have confronted what actors must endure with regards to type casting, and given my age and the fact that I can just make music at home for myself and my friends, it might be more fulfilling. I’m almost 50 and have zero interest in making consecutive Beautiful Midnights, etc. That was decades ago. And even those albums since, especially the last one, were written without facing any internal compulsion to change. And that’s on me. After Lights, I should have just kept going. When I sat down and wrote Arrows it was just easy. I’d seen the dissatisfaction on the faces of concert goers on the Lights tour and knee jerked. It’s something I should never have done. The same is true of Chaotic Neutral which should have sustained the vibe of Harridan, Tiger, Cold Water, Los Alamos, etc, without the interjection of “rock songs”. Again, that’s on me. At some point you’ve got to look at yourself and make a decision. The knee jerk reactions that occur given significant successes decades ago cannot be the present. In fact, in many cases, they should never have remained in your subconscious and turned you away from going somewhere else. In the end, given music today, all of this is basically pointless. Artistry has no worth. For a monthly fee on a streaming service you can listen to whatever you want. Ask a plumber to work for $8.99 a month and they’d laugh at you. Reading comments complaining about ticket prices is also rather hilarious when you think that people pay over $100 to see a stadium show sitting in the nose bleeds. It’s all relative, and to me all very perplexing and disheartening. Leonardo da Vinci's Salvator Mundi sold for $450 million dollars in 2017. It is the most expensive piece of art ever sold. To me, Mozart is worth no less. In truth, his collected works, given the impact they’ve had, are worth vastly more. But you can download all of Don Giovanni for the price of a monthly music subscription. What artists do is not pedestrian. Were that the case, everyone would be an artist. There is good and bad art, art is subjective. There are artists whose genius is not realized in their lifetimes, there are artists whose genius alters the discourse of entire generations during their lifetimes. There are catchy tunes that are massive hits that are laughed at a decade later. There are albums that sell next to nothing that spread like spider webs to influence thousands in the deepest recesses of their soul. The most important aspect of art is, in truth, not how it initially impacts us, but how it challenges us intellectually and spiritually to succumb to something we are not so easily accustomed to. Satiating the masses at any given point given popular methodologies is not difficult. Challenging individuals to discover something buried within them that transverses the barrier between instant gratification and the longevity of a love affair is not the goal of an artist, but the dream of every artist. Because to accomplish the latter is to leave a legacy. In the words of Marcel Duchamp - “What art is, in reality, is this missing link, not the links which exist. It's not what you see that is art; art is the gap.” So mind the gap.
  2. 7 points
    Greetings All! This is John Shepp, Producer/Engineer/Multi-instrumentalist. I know, too many hats to wear. On July 1, 2020, it will be exactly 25 years to the day the lead off single "Alabama Motel Room" was tracked at Utopia Parkway Studio B. It was one of the last songs we recorded in the span of time between early 1994 (a year and a half) and completion some time in August of 1995. Three different band lineups, an award winning demo (Euphony), an EMI publishing deal, a management deal, a ground breaking indy debut, a record deal... and poof, the Astronaut was launched to become the Underdog. You know I've never told my part of this story to the interwebs, just to people who wanted to know. Perhaps I should?
  3. 7 points
    Last year i mentioned some footage i was hoping to obtain that would contain some pretty rare video of the Matthew Good Band. Well after many months of waiting i was finally able to get that material, transfer it and with Chad's help we have got it uploaded and it will be shared through his site tomorrow. Unfortunately the amount of material was less than originally thought thanks to tapes being lent and never returned however the material that was still there although brief is still pretty incredible and goes right back to the start of the Matthew Good Band. For most here theyve probably never seen any of this. And those that have its probably been well over twenty years since they did. Im Very excited to have been able to find this stuff and get it transfered and very grateful for Chad offering his web site to host this material so that Matt Good fans can see it. I recently asked Matt if he would consider a chronological live album or footage release and while i wont go into specifics of his reasoning here, he was pretty emphatic that he would not. So for the time being these kinds of attic discoveries are our only way to find material such as this. So if you know anyone who might have taped shows on MUCH or videoed concerts they went to, reach out and ask if they happened to record any Matthew Good. You never know what might be turned up. Finally these tapes are being released as a tribute to MGB bass player Geoff Lloyd. Most of this material stems from Geoffs time in the band and is some of the only live footage we have from Geoffs era. It really showcases what he brought to the group and his contributions to some incredible music. Im very proud to be a part of the group putting this stuff out there because hopefully it will help people to remember Geoff and the band during his tenure.
  4. 7 points
    I am working on something for all of you at the moment that will include the complete video of Sharks Of Downtown among others. stay posted.
  5. 6 points
    Sorry guys patience will have to be of the essence here. What ive found is a large collection of video material throughout Matt's career. a portion of it is stuff none of us here have ever seen before. The material is being collected from a few sources and being sent to me. As I do not have any of it yet it is naturally impossible to give a time frame. All I can do is wait until I receive it all then I can do my part aling with another member here to get it out to you. What I have right now are samples sent to me to verify the material in the collection. This includes the entire video of Sharks. i have not been given permission to share yet so im not going to jeopardize getting several hours worth of footage by jumping the gun on a couple minutes worth of samples. Hang tight the material is coming but an ETA is out of my control at the moment
  6. 5 points
    And the videos are now live on my site http://mattgood.plastic-soldier.com/downloads-video.php The first 5 videos on the page are the newly added ones, with the awesomeness of the first video being the entire performance of Sharks Of Downtown! I did create an MP3 of the song from the video. linked on the main page (http://mattgood.plastic-soldier.com/) as well as on the audio downloads page
  7. 5 points
    Hey everyone, I hope you’re all well. I took a break from interacting on here but wanted to jump back on to go over the acoustic tour next year. First, the dates that have been randomly coming out are because certain community theatres have to announce their schedules ahead of time for the courtesy of their patrons. That would be why theatres in smaller towns have announced shows, because I’m on their performance schedule for the year. That said, this month the entire tour is being rolled out and will include shows in major centres. The tour is actually pretty extensive and I’ll be playing some smaller places that I’d otherwise not. Given it’s an acoustic tour, and I’ve not done one in Canada since Hospital Music, I’m really looking forward to it. The downside is that I might have to endure reading the entirety of “The Art Of The Deal” to find the best passages to read during shows (hehe). Anyway, I know I’d mentioned an idea of doing very small shows at higher ticket prices, in excess of $100, but we decided it would be better to do things normally. I’ll check back and try and answer some questions if I can. Best. Matt.
  8. 4 points
    The first run of CD's had the well known misprint of the word Ghetto as Ghello, but did you know it also had Matt's birthday, MGB290671? That's today, so happy 49th birthday Matt!
  9. 4 points
    There are no words for it in this moment. Go. Listen. https://www.matthewgood.org/datlight-actual
  10. 4 points
    Today is my son's birthday... he would have been 11. We're having Kraft Dinner (Mac and Cheese) with chocolate cake for supper. Some of his favourite foods. It also happens to be autism awareness day, he had Asperger's. He loved video games. Mine-craft, Super Mario, Zelda (Breath of the Wild), Pokemon. I introduced him when he was 3 years old. He started with Mario 3 on GBA. He beat Breath of the Wild when he was 8 years old. He also loved the music from video games. He would sit in the van with the GBA to his ear listening to the music from the Final Fantasy Beastiary. He also liked the music from Undertale and Chrono Trigger. It's a good day though you know. Life is good, don't take anything for granted.
  11. 4 points
    Matt's father passed away last night. Matt announced that he intends to go on with the tour. Much respect to Matt and my thoughts and prayers go out to Matt and his family.
  12. 4 points
    For certain reasons, I can't provide footage from the show. However, I have uploaded one track from the show as an unlisted video on YouTube for the members of this board. Please do not circulate or share this link outside of this forum. Haven't Slept In Years - Cheers
  13. 4 points
    Sorry if this is too much video to post at once. Please delete if so. These are the videos I took of Matthew Good. Some of these videos almost sound better to me than actually being there somehow. Like his voice is louder/clearer. From where I was it was decently loud for the most part but I thought it could be louder.
  14. 4 points
    Here's a crack at the lyrics for Sharks of Downtown. I will say this is probably 80% right, there are some things that are hard to make out and somethings that I probably think I nailed but will turn out I was totally off base on, but this should be pretty close. I dream of Dolphins all the time Casual palm trees don't do well in my backyard I drink cocktails with rum Sit in the sun, casually undone The fish never move on my shower curtains The Sharks of downtown Wear dolphin skin suits and they hold on to girls who didn't listen when their mothers told them not to see guys like me Going nowhere Going nowhere I dream of dolphins all the time ? Nuclear submarines They will dream about you and I Not like this guy Not today, Not today The Sharks of Downtown Wear blackened turtle necks and hold on to words I was gonna use to tell you about guys like me Going nowhere Going nowhere See you lying in the shower nothing happens I'm glad to pay our debt to the realm of human beings and tomorrow I'll try the game and keep searching for the dolphin the same as all, all these seas I'm nervous when I'm next to you I am nervous when I'm not Cause after everything is said and done you're just looking to get caught and the engine ? It's all the same It's all the same thing Yippie Kai ai eh Yippie Kai ai eh Yippie Kai ai eh Yippie Kai ai eh I think about it all the time That's the rule When you are what you eat But not what they preach I won't dream about you and I Not like this guy Not today, No not today, No not today, no The Sharks of Downtown Wear dolphin skin suits and they Own all the earth Or at least the one that was made in seven days Guys like me are going nowhere Going nowhere Yippie Kai ai eh Yippie Kai ai eh Yippie Kai ai eh Yippie Kai ai eh
  15. 3 points
    Here it is kids! Be advised no audio in this video for legal reasons, and it should generate a few questions.
  16. 3 points
    As an exercise over the years, I've designed a ton of (alternate) album art, some using other artists' materials, some entirely self-generated. If you've ever seen that Cold Harbor cover with the blacked out figure looking at a ship, that's one of mine-- though embarrassingly bad since I wasn't an art director yet. I figured I'd drop them in here for the only group of people who'd really be interested. Enjoy.
  17. 3 points
    Hey Tips no sweat, happy to say my say! The transition was not gradual at all. We had just finished mixing the Lost Album (actually I did most of it while the original lineup was on tour) then, boom, one phone call later, I was at Matt's apartment meeting Geoff Lloyd. I believe I didn't meet Ian that day but could be wrong. I believe Geoff relates this story in the memorial thread, about him being at Undertones and getting the call. At any rate the only orginal member on the newer material at that point would be Judy. LOTGA proper started in March of 1995, with the Charlie Quintana session, at which Charlie laid the song Revenge down, then a tambourine track, then Ian stepped in a delivered Fearless and Vermillion. Dave was there throughout and we cut some organ tracks on Vermillion and Revenge, the follow sessions were to overdub Steve Black's Piano on Fearless, Judy's cello, and Ian did the background vocals. Dave was a hired gun at first, but he was fully into it. and was really a big reason this album had legs, he added so much glue to the arrangements. Funny memory comes up. He'd always have to haul the organ rig from the Town Pump where it was stored and we'd hump it in. After hours of tooling re tooling the tracks we'd haul it all back into the van at 3am or some ungodly hour. He'd always say "Don't dont call me to come back and fix anything!" So essentially, when it became Ian, Geoff and Dave, we quickly forgot about the previous Lost Album material. Everything you hear occurred after the Charlie session, and ultimately, Charlie's contributions were forgotten too as Revenge was not in the final lineup. There we at the end three different sequences to what became LOTGA, at first it was something like 15 songs but it was eventually culled down to the final order you hear. Raygun happened likely out of a need to expose MGB to the US market, but there's been plenty said about the Private deal already, I have nothing to add there. When you look at the albums that MGB did after, well, Dave and Matt were collaberating then. But on LOTGA, the only co-write is Alabama Motel Room (Good, Lloyd,Browne) So still confusion about the band lineup? Euphony had Danny and Joe 15 hours and the Lost album had Ariel and Erin LOTGA had Geoff and Ian Judy was on all three The was a marked difference in the material on Lost, way more folk, way more lyrics. More Talk Talk than Pixies, and LOTGA had a blend between the two.
  18. 3 points
    Hey y'all, been awhile. This might be common knowledge at this point, I dunno, but I know some of you have been searching a long time for a lossless version of All Together. Well, I'm re-doing my music library and trying to plug holes, and just happened to find that 7digital.ca has FLAC All Together for sale! I don't know how long that's been there, but I had never found it before! There is also a live acoustic version of Prime Time Deliverance as a bonus track to Vancouver (likely from the same show as the other Vancouver digital acoustic bonus tracks). Go now, and send MG a couple of bucks so he can tour again when it's possible!
  19. 3 points
    Thanks for posting this Daniel. So often on forums like these members just vanish and you never know what became of them. Did they lose interest, or just have less spare time to devote to their interests. It's hard to believe Travis is gone since it seems like just the other day we were at his place meeting him for the first time. Travis was a member here for a short while, but left a big impact. When I found clips of the footage he shot on the tapes I transferred for Geoff Lloyd's sister Sue, I was surprised to find that there appeared to be very good footage of several points of the show, and since it wasn't filmed by MUCH there may be a chance it might be accessible. But I had no leads on how to track it down. Miraculously a short time later, Travis stumbled upon his original tapes and decided to do an internet search to try and find the date of the show. When he did he found our forum here and our discussion about it. There are times in life where coincidence is so bizarre. As I later recanted to Travis, Sue had held onto those tapes for nearly 25 years before I was able to transfer and upload them. If she had held on just 6 months longer, Travis would have found his tapes, did an internet search, not found any of our discussion or footage and in all likelihood would have missed getting in touch with us all together. Conversely if Travis not stumbled across his tapes when he did with his tragic passing they would have been most likely lost forever. Travis was a fan of MGB growing up, but his musical tastes had diverged into different areas in recent years. But when he found out how much seeing that footage meant to Daniel and I, he immediately set into motion a set of circumstances that would allow it. He spent countless hours editing and always trying to improve the footage, with some great results. He then offered if Daniel and I were willing to travel to his place he would show it to us in the theater room of his apartment complex. He even offered his couch to crash on, to complete strangers, just because we happened to share a common interest, such was the nature of the man. Daniel and I had a great time watching the MGB footage was incredible and then we just hung out, talked music, watched some South Park, Travis struck me as a very caring person with a great sense of humour. I had hope next time Matt came to town to buy Travis a ticket and convince him to come along, but unfortunately fate stepped in the way. I'll miss Travis and I'm thankful for the brief period I got to know him and for all the benefit that brief meeting has given me. It was Travis' hope to be able to share his footage with everyone, but he had some stipulations. Because he had shot it as part of his profession he was weary to share it without approval from the band members. He was able to reach out and get copies to Dave and Ian, but unfortunately we were unable to get in touch with Matt. He dedicated the footage to the memory of Geoff Lloyd, but I suppose now it serves as his epitaph as well. May he too rest in "Rawk Heaven."
  20. 3 points
    Been meaning to do this for awhile, but just trying to find the time. First great idea for a thread it's very interesting to hear what really stood out to people and how certain things stand out or left them cold and their reasons for why. I know for me this list probably has changed throughout the years, some albums that I held in a certain regard resonated differently with me throughout the years, some initially I felt were some of his best work and then later they didn't have as much impact, others that I felt weren't his strongest efforts, later grew on me more, so it's interesting how the material and what it means to me is in a constant state of flux, as I suppose is my life and feelings, which is one of the most impressive things about art. Also I should point out that I very rarely cherry pick songs from Matt's albums. If I am in the mood to listen to him I almost always listen to the entire album at once, so I don't really skip tracks on any of them. Basically what it comes down to for me is how often I find myself reaching for the albums, so my feelings about them may vary alot from someone who looks at the albums as individually separable songs. 8. Something Like A Storm (2017) This was one of my most anticipated albums from Matt's solo career. I had seen a ton of shows on the BM Revisited tour and had the chance to chat with the band alot and they were very excited about the new recordings, in addition obviously Decades was previewed on that tour, so I was eagerly awaiting this one. Ultimately it just didn't resonate with me much. Bad Guys Win was very topical at the time and initially I really enjoyed it, but repeated listens it didn't hold the same impact for me. I usually find the biggest single off an album is a track that doesn't really do much for me, and Decades is no different here. But unlike other albums, many of the deeper cuts also lacked some appeal for me leaving me a little underwhelmed with this album. The high points are still pretty high for me though. Men at the Door, Something Like A Storm and Bullets in a Briefcase are top tier songs for me. Actually those songs, sadly suffer more than any other in Matt's catalog for me because of my decision to not just listen to individual tracks, so unfortunately they don't get very much play, despite being great songs. This album took some inspiration from 1980's style music and production, which I am not a huge fan of, so it doesn't surprise me that some of the songs just aren't to my usual taste. I wonder if I would feel different about this album if it was properly toured? Later on in the list I'll talk about albums whose ranking was improved after I saw how the songs translated live, which these songs never really got a chance to. As mentioned earlier in 2017, only Decades was played on the BM Revisited tour. Matt's next major tour was the 2018 Co-Headline with OLP. Obviously this kind of tour resulted in truncated sets and things more hits/nostalgia related so many of the shows only featured a few of these tracks, and in addition I never had the chance to see this tour. Then by the 2019 acoustic tour, only a small amount of this material was featured. I've had the privilege to attend multiple shows on most Matt Good tours since 2008, and as such I have seen the majority of the songs from most of Matt's albums played live since Hospital Music, yet with Something Like A Storm I've only heard two of the songs live, and one of them is my least favourite on the album. It's unlikely most of this material will feature in future live sets so there is little at this point that will probably change my evaluation of this album. 7. Arrows of Desire (2013) In the lead up to Arrows there was a lot to be excited about. Matt was with a new label, an independent label that I had hoped might give him some freedom to do what he wanted. In addition Matt talked about wanting to write something more commercial, and I thought we might be in for something a little more hard rocking than his last few efforts. Like usually I was a bit off put by the initial single of Had it Coming/We're Long Gone, and still feel Had it Coming is my least favourite song in Matt's solo discography. I was worried it might preview a trend to sacrifice some of his usually amazing lyrics for something more generic and radio friendly, so I hoped that wouldn't permeate throughout the album. The album definitely has some harder rocking songs, and I feel as a whole it hangs together pretty good. Unlike Something Like a Storm, I feel this album is more consistent. The highlights on SLAS are higher for me than the peaks here, but the album also has deeper lows. Guns of Carolina is a beautiful song and Via Dolorosa has great lyrics. The title track, Letters in Wartime and Garden of Knives, which really stood out to me after seeing it open one of the live shows are other favourites. I was able to see every song off this album performed live, and I think only Garden of Knives benefited from that setting. The shows I saw were at the end of the tour, and more so than at any other time Matt seemed pretty exhausted to me, so that may have played in to why nothing else was really elevated through live performance. I know Matt was unhappy with this label and that may have resulted in this album not being all that it could have been, but it is one that gets rare playbacks from me. I definitely think this is an example of an album I liked more at first, but over time it has worn a little thin for me. Also, I noticed that the material from it quickly vanished from the live set after the 2013 tour and that nothing has really been played live from it since. 6. White Light Rock and Roll Review (2004) In theory this should be one of my favourite Matt Good albums. Matt and I share an affinity for 60's/70's classic rock and this album is an obvious homage to that era of music. In addition much of it was recorded live off the floor which should capture more of the energy of the performance, which is right up my alley. Ultimately though the songs just aren't as strong as I've come to expect from Matt. So even though I love the way this record sounds, I don't play it through very often because not much of it is overly memorable to me. I will say however, in the right mood this album really can appeal to me, so every so often I dust it off and really get into it. After Avalanche this one came as a return to a much harder edged sound that is a welcome departure and continued to show that his solo career would have some variety. This one wastes no time announcing what kind of record it will be with Put Out Your Lights kicking the doors in right away. The album starts off with a punch in the nose, but then shows it's multidimensional appeal with the dynamics of We're So Heavy and the laid back country rock of Empty Road. Some here seem to really dislike Alert Status Red, I'm not one of them, its one of the few MG solo singles I really do like and I think it works live both acoustic and electric. My only gripe is that it so often is used as the only representation of this album on most tours. Sometimes on this album I find the energy level is there just for the sake of being there. North American For Life musically could be an outtake from Underdogs, but something about it just feels forced to me and it's never really been a favourite. Blue Skies is fantastic here, it just feels so genuine and heartfelt with some eye opening lyrics about the commonality of life, probably my favourite song on the record. It's Been Awhile Since I Was Your Man is one of the weaker tracks here, it seems rather generic for the sake of being generic, but the album closes with two of my favourite tracks here in Buffalo Seven and Ex- Pats before the hidden track of Hopeless, hidden because it was deemed to country for the record. This was the last MG tour that I didn't get to see live, but a decent amount of this album has featured (albeit briefly) in other tours since, so I've heard half of this album in concert. I think live, many of these songs work better than they do on the album, the energy they provide in a concert setting makes up for and masks some of their shortcomings. Having just a song or two from this album in a setlist is probably not as impactful because the intensity of it is short lived. I imagine the 2004/2005 shows would have had a greater impact with the bulk of the material getting played. I've wondered sometimes if this album suffered from the fact that it was rushed out. Right from Ghetto Astronauts, Matt always had a 2 year cycle between albums. This album came right on the heels of Avalanche, and Avalanche is Matt's longest running album of his career so between the two of them you have to wonder if he was stretched thin on his songwriting muse. I wonder if he had taken a little more time with this one if he may have developed some songs further or written others to replace what is here. Oddly of all his albums, the outtakes from this are my favourite and I would gladly substitute a few tracks here for them. Of all of his solo releases I think this one had the most potential under different circumstances, but I can't judge it for what it could have been, so it finds itself in the bottom third. With that said, I think this album would still benefit from a vinyl release because sonically it is a very pleasing album, and in that medium it might really stand out. It's the only one of his albums to not have a release in that format. 5. Lights of Endangered Species (2011) Perhaps no Matthew Good album is effected by my mood as much as this one. The reason this isn't ranked higher is because I am not always in the mood to really get into this record and get the most out of it, but when I am it is so effective and some of the finest music Matt has every produced. For one, it is different. While all of his albums to this point had the obligatory rockers, this one doesn't even try, at least not in the conventional sense. It has a real self awareness to it, and a peaceful yet calming pace like watching the first snowfall of winter. The songs are beautifully written and arranged and link together as an album perhaps better than any other record in his career. Extraordinary Fades and In a Place of Lesser Men are the only tracks here that do little for me, everything else is of a very high standard. Shallow's Low is absolutely haunting, while How it Goes is a beautifully intricate piece. Zero Orchestra is one of my favourite of Matt's solo tracks. The music is punchy, a mix of Jazz, Big Band and Rock that really packs in the energy and Matt unleashes a fiery vocal perfectly suited for the tone of the song. The title track is a perfect closer for the album as well. Non Populus is really the stand out here though. It is one of the tracks that if asked why I listen so much to Matthew Good, I would offer as an example. Its perfection. The entire way the song is allowed to breath and grow from it's subtle beginnings to it's climatic ending shows how mature and talented Matt is as a songwriter. It's just such an epic journey of a listen, but it's an inward journey one full of revelation and reflection. Sometimes as an artist you capture lightning in a bottle and to me that's what Matt has done here. I got to hear most of this album live and it really did enhance it for me, particularly on the title track and Non Populus where the guitar would just cut through the room. I remember no matter how many times I heard that song played I was left standing in stunned silence. It's unfortunate that the nature of this album makes it some of his less accessible material and as such it was very polarizing among his fan base, is there any other album that could find itself either at the top or bottom of a fans list? 4. Hospital Music (2007) Hospital Music has the distinction of being for me the last album Matt released before I really became an obsessive fan. Prior to 2008 I into Matt and would add his singles to mixed cd's and playlists, but really hadn't bought all his albums, nor had I been to a live show. Starting with his 2008 tour I went out and picked up his entire discography and in particular paid close attention to Hospital Music, knowing it would be the feature album at the shows I would attend. It definitely has a more stripped back, open and honest approach, which was especially refreshing following White Light, which seemed the opposite to this record in many ways. It starts off with Champions of Nothing, a powerful song that strikes right at your heart and sets the tone for the album. Actually the entire first half of this album is some of Matt's finest solo work. There is so much emotion and feeling in these songs, and the pain is so evident, some times it can even be an uncomfortable listen because of that, party music this is not. Black Helicopter is a strong song, but feels a bit out of place on the album, and Born Losers (although I decry how frequently it gets played live) is a very strong song, and a perfect single for this album, there is little not to like in the first half. The second half is much more inconsistent. The Devils In Your Details is catchy as hell, but not much substance and Moon Over Marin is an interesting cover, but then it's followed by two kind of throw away tracks that really add nothing to the album. I'm a Window is a solid angry rocker, really the only one of it's kind of this album. The album closes out with a couple strong tracks, the final being a cover, but ultimately the second half pales in comparison to the first, leaving for an uneven feeling that peters out as the album progresses. If it wasn't for this this album would rank higher on the list, but all three albums ahead of it are more consistent throughout. I've seen 2/3rds of this album in a live setting, and generally the songs work better for me in that format. There is something about hearing Matt play 99% to a live audience and being able to hear a pin drop throughout that is pretty memorable. Matt has wisely avoided overdoing it with instrumentation in live settings with these songs and many really benefit from solo acoustic renditions or with very sparse backing from the band. This era helped launch Matt as a solo acoustic artists as well, which has enabled several tours in that vein. While not to everyone's tastes it is certainly a nice alternative. Perhaps of all of Matt's albums this is expectedly the most therapeutic. 3. Chaotic Neutral (2015) This one really surprised me. Coming off of Arrows I wasn't too sure what to expect next from Matt. He was signing with a new label, seemed to be having some issues in his personal life and I had a feeling I would either really love or really dislike the next album. Thankfully it was the latter. After several more mellow albums, Matt had a sense of urgency on this album, and a bit of an angry edge that had been so prevalent in his earlier music, that right away I picked up on and it carried me through this record. Oddly enough, it starts with an outtake from a previous album that wound up being the lead single off this one. But thats not to say this album is second tiered, it's just he hadn't been able to realize that song fully in the past and now here had perfected it. Moment seems like it could have fit well on Avalanche, and actually I think that's part of what I like so much about this album. It sounds like a culmination of all the different eras of Matt's solo career. You hear songs that sound like they could fit on all of his previous solo albums and yet all while maintaining their own uniqueness and flow. No Liars is my least favourite here, although it is pretty infectious. Cloudbusting is a really cool cover too, and I appreciate him bringing Holly McNarland in to do this one with him! The masterpeice on this album is Los Alamos. There is something just painfully heartbreaking about this song and the simple yet melancholic backing music is a perfect match for the lyrical content, one of those songs where the artist just hits an absolute homerun! I was fortunate to hear all of this album live except Tiger By The Tail (damn Stu!) and it probably moved up a position or two because of the live performances. Most songs here were enhanced in the live setting, but in particular were Los Alamos and Girls in Black. Los Alamos because basically the lighting turned Matt into a silhouette and you could really see nothing so all your mind could grasp was the harrowing sounds of his voice echoing around the hall. Girl in Black meanwhile took on a whole different tone of vicious intensity live as at times MAtt seemed to be ranting and raving as he shouted the lyrics and stormed out into the crowd. Definitely some of the best shows I have seen of Matt solo were on this tour and a big part of that was because of the strength of the new material which always features prominently in Matts set. 2. Vancouver (2009) This one doesn't seem to get nearly as much love as I afford it here. To me, like Lights it is a complete album, on their own very little here stands out, but listened to as a complete piece it has a great deal of merit. I wonder if perhaps I rate this one higher than others because around the time of it's release I was spending a great deal of time in Vancouver and seeing first hand some of the changes an social issues the album strikes at. The Last Parade is the last MG single I remember getting a great deal of radio play, and it helped that I quite liked the song, the visual imagery of the lyrics in this song are visceral and contemplative, something lacking in many of the singles after this. The opening trifecta all have a similar feel sonically although they explore differing themes, The Boy who Could Explode is the strongest of the three, and fittingly also the longest. Us Remains Impossible and Fought to Fight it are the weakest tracks here for me, they are both catchy and perhaps radio friendly, but they lack the punch of the rest of the album, still they are decent enough tracks and I am never tempted to skip over them. Silent Army in the Trees has lyrics that are quite haunting and On Nights Like Tonight is another highlight for me because of the way the song builds upon itself, similar to the song Avalanche. Vancouver National Anthem is the song that deals most bluntly with the changing city the album is named for, but it's Empty's Theme Park that drives that theme home in such a transcendent way. Like many of Good's solo works, it is the long epic that is the real take away here, a song with some great lyrics and a perfect album closer. Sometime around this period Matt lost some of his range as well, so all of the albums after this no longer featured some of the real high stuff he was capable of doing throughout his career up to this point. This was the first tour where I decided I needed to go to as many shows as possible, and seeing 5 shows managed to see all of this album performed live, with the Last Parade really being the only song that was obviously stronger on the record. Many of the songs seemed to work as effectively in a live setting, but one real standout was Empty's Theme Park. It was way heavier in the arrangement they played live, in large part due to Blake's drums which were just manic on the jammed out sections. The build up to the end was such a climax that really added to the way it was played on the album to make the song even more epic, which is a challenging task. It's a shame nothing from this album gets played live anymore, because all the songs really worked pretty well in that format, and as one of my favourite albums of Matt's career I would love to see more of this make a reappearance in the setlist from time to time. 1. Avalanche (2003) I mentioned before about Matt's vocal range changing sometime around the time he hit 40, well here on this album you hear it at it's absolute zenith. During the MGB days he often used his voice with reckless abandon, but by Avalanche he was operating with full capacity, but also with a mature control that allowed him to refrain from overuse and only utilize the full power of his voice at critical moments. In addition, because this was his first solo album, he had something to prove and he set out to do so. Not just playing it safe he altered the overall sound of his music, brought in the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra and wrote the longest album of his career with some of the absolute highpoints of his career featuring in the process. That extended length is one of the albums few weak points, as if trimmed by a couple of songs would be basically a flawless album. The album starts with Pledge of Allegiance which immediately established the soundscape approach to the record, varying from the more guitar centric sounds of the MGB. Lullaby is a standard pop song followed by Weapon which is anything but. A lengthy track without a chorus is hardly the kind of thing one would expect to get much radio play, but it was a huge hit and still features as a showstopper in his live repertoire today. In A World Called Catastrophe is Matt's biggest hit single and is a solid song with some of Matt's best vocals. After is Avalanche, long cited as one of Matt's favourite of his own compositions it is a progressive masterpiece that builds and builds to a climax, and then ends just as unassuming as it began, a masterclass in songwriting. 21st Century is one of the more polarizing tracks on the album, but it serves as a time capsule for the kind of political anger Matt was immersed in at the time and gives a window into his mentality while creating this record. This album has so many epic tracks Rabbits and Near Fantastica have long been established as fan favourites and both are phenomenal tracks so immesive that one hardly notices their 8 minute track length. Bright End of Nowhere and Long Way Down are some of the better shorter tracks towards the end of the album somewhat lost in a sea of elongated epics. The song closes with House of Smoke and Mirrors one of Matts better album closers in his career, perfectly capping what I said was an almost flawless album. Song for the Girl is the only track here that I can really do without. Despite being such a solid album, very little of it has been played in recent years. As such I have only seen Matt play four of the tracks off this album and both Avalanche and In A World Called Catastrophe were very rare performances. It's a shame really that such a strong album is reduced most nights to just Weapon in a live setting. Of course Weapon is so dynamic live that it is played at nearly every show and often as the main set closer. Still it would be a treat to get to hear more of this album played in a live context. Even before I attended shows this material was quickly ushered out of the setlist as White Light was issued just a year later and it's songs quickly replaced some of the deeper Avalanche cuts. Despite that it remains the pinnacle for me of Matt's solo work. It showcases an artist at the top of his game with all of his artistic assets firing on all cylinders to compose something truly incredible and even 17 years on, it remains as fresh for me today as it did back then. So excuse me while I go fire up my turn table and drop my alternate tracklist vinyl version of the album under the needle for a much needed spin, no matter how long it's been...it's been too long.
  21. 3 points
    Pretty cool. Second professional video Matt's been in since 2004. Really like the setting, lighting, fireworks and, for the most part, the editing. Nice to see he included his new girlfriend in the video too. Glad to see the guy has someone in his life again. Also just appreciated Matt's presence in the video in general. He always seems to convey a good sense of authenticity (I'm thinking specifically of the Apparitions and Strange Day videos). Thoughts?
  22. 3 points
    Dear all, dear Rhu8ar8Pi3, I apologize if this message is not appropriate in this section of the forum, but I would like –if the administrators let me– to STRONGLY THANK this member from this wonderful group (Rhu8ar8Pi3) for all the gifts I have just received today related to our adored MG. This means a lot to me. For me it is very difficult to see MG live, to even talk to him or simply saying that "I am a great Spanish fan" of him, living so far away from Canada. For that reason, receiving these gifts makes me very, very happy, closer to MG and very thankful. I just wanted to publicly thank Rhu8ar8Pi3 for her kindness and generosity sharing all these things with me. Thanks a lot, honest. I feel very proud of being a member of this group and be in touch with such nice and generous people here Big hugs from Spain, Juanpe
  23. 3 points
    If anybody is really that interested, I've posted the full interview from the '98 show (all 4 clumsy minutes of it) here - feel free to do with it as you wish - I couldn't even bear listening to it so I hope it turned out haha... https://youtu.be/h-CVoS2oMV0 Cheers Travis
  24. 3 points
    Hi guys, Thanks for the discretion in keeping the link private. I felt I should address the replies that have followed since my first posts - As much as I'd love to provide the whole show for every MGB fan on this board and worldwide, there's a plethora of reasons of why I cannot. The major reasons involve media/journalist integrity - footage like this is supposed to be only used sparingly as B-Roll (like what was used in the Rogers piece) and then discarded once the final piece is finished. I had already overstepped my boundaries by recording almost the entire show (usually you only need about 5-10 minutes at most for a story like that), which I'm sure I certainly wouldn't have gotten permission to do had anyone in the MGB camp known. Being as I am still a camera op, I cannot risk gaining a reputation of abusing media privileges by releasing footage containing material that technically shouldn't exist, is unauthorized, unapproved, and copyrighted out to anybody. I know now that this footage is apparently quite rare, but it doesn't change the fact. While this does seem like a trustworthy group, it's just something I cannot do. Even privately, with the promise of not spreading it around, it doesn't change the fact that it's not my material to distribute. In afterthought, even posting that one song on Youtube was something I shouldn't have done. Even as an unlisted video, it already has a copyright claim against it, so who knows how long it'll even exist up there. Another reason is that I don't want to ruffle any feathers with record labels, their lawyers, and especially Matthew himself. While I hear he used to have a much larger online social presence, including historically posting to this forum, I'm certain as the day is long that if he found any of this footage circulating around without his prior direct consent (and the consent of his record label and management likely), that he'd be pretty f*cking pissed at that clumsy 17 year kid who fumbled through likely the worst interview of his life 20 years ago, and I don't want that kind of karma from someone I respect. From what I hear, Matthew does not have a very fond place in his spiritual mindset for nostalgia, or the past in general (or at least he doesn't anymore). I attempted to track down a method of communication in which to reach him directly (just to let him know that the footage exists, and if he wanted a copy of it), but he seems to currently have a fortress around his online social presence and it looks to me like he doesn't want anything to do with random fans/people sending him messages. I don't think there's even much attention paid to his official website anymore because there's little actual content, the MG smartphone app that is advertised all over the site no longer exists, and there's not even a contact option. However, if any of you still have direct contact with him, or Ian/Dave, then by all means, pass along the information, tell them that the offer is available to them, and maybe they'll consent to letting you keep a copy for yourself. And for the guys above offering me money to send them the show in exchange for secrecy - I appreciate the offer - I know you mean well, and that it's a "holy grail" of sorts, but profiting off of the footage would makes things worse tenfold. I'm really sorry everyone - I didn't mean to open Pandora's box - I didn't know that footage like this was so rare. I kind of dropped off the MG(B) radar once they broke up, and I had just assumed that much more material would be available since they were the biggest band in Canada for at least a couple of years. Anyways, I just wanted to explain myself so I didn't leave anyone hanging with their hopes up. I mean - for god sakes - that awfully done Rogers Cable story/interview I made surfaced on Youtube 20 years later - imagine how many places the source material would find itself if it ever saw the light of internet day. Keep rockin' y'all - don't hate me! Cheers, Travis
  25. 3 points
    This is...really epic, exciting, and organic sounding https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw8p_t-g_v2/ Hopefully it leads somewhere big. Though Something Like a Storm sounded like it was going somewhere massive too and then just faded out, so hopefully this one is a little different in that sense. I doubt Matt would share the climax of a song before it was finished.
  26. 3 points
    Hard to believe that 20 years ago this month (Sept 14th to be exact) is when Beautiful Midnight was released. Man, do I feel old now lol An album that lived up to and exceeded expectations....I still remember where I bought it, opening it up and seeing the monkey mask on the CD and the little words “hidden” in the liner notes booklet printed in clear ink (if that makes any sense), how I listened to it, what songs really hooked me, and how it was the soundtrack to my life then and marked some significant changes in my life. Thx to Matt & crew for that album - such a masterpiece.
  27. 3 points
    A Boy And His Machine Gun Let's Get It On
  28. 3 points
  29. 3 points
    It's been a month and MG is winding down his tour on the run back through the West. Of the Alberta shows I attended the Edmonton (March 20) one at Starlite Room was the one I anticipated the least. Starlite Room is a GA venue geared towards loud shows and after hearing pin drop quiet rooms in St. Albert, Camrose or Ft. Saskatchewan I worried that there were be "woo" birds, drink/bar noise and talking throughout. Thankfully it was quieter than I expected but still noisier than I would have liked. The evening started with the VIP Experience (at 6PM when doors were at 8PM, so a quick turnaround). MG played Selling You My Heart, Men at the Door and Hopeless. I've refrained from hearing any of the "new" songs and it was great to finally hear this in person; Men at the Door was excellent and Hopeless had a fun upbeat sound to it. During the Q&A I asked about the lack of a proper Something Like a Storm headlining tour and MG acknowledged that it didn't get one but he does play what he likes from the record and admits that there are some he can't play solo. As the album was recorded in two stages and this affects how he looks back on the record. With the new album being mostly acoustic the supporting tour may not see much more than we already have from the album. MG took the stage at 10PM and played for about an 1h40m, I'll have to check the runtime (late night, short sleep, more on that later), but the setlist had 17 songs and So Long Mrs. Smith was more than a snippet, and may have been the highlight for me. MG also served up a few verses of Tangled Up in Blue (Dylan) before Load Me Up, so there was good reason for a slightly longer runtime. The "new to me" songs were Selling You My Heart, Men At the Door, So Long Mrs. Smith and Avalanche; and for being my fourth show to still get a quarter of the setlist that is fresh is stunning. Avalanche was thrown in to the final spot in place of Blue Skies and I don't think anyone complained about that. A song that's typically in the opener spot fits in quite well as a closer. For a long few months of touring I was worried that illness would haunt MG at every show but he was in good spirits, seemed relaxed during the VIP Experience and had some nice song banter in the main set. The crowd was mostly respectful and quiet...or as much as you can be in a bar. There was talking, there was the sound of coins clinking in a glass, but there were also people "shushing" others so the majority tried to be quiet. Unfortunately it doesn't take much crowd noise to ruin a haunting performance of Los Alamos or lessen the impact of Fated. Like I said at the start, it was better than I expected (I was bracing for Grande Prairie and constant talking) but unfortunate that there was distracting noises all the same. The crowd was in to the Load Me Up challenge and failed on the second verse but they still wanted to sing along anyway. The one benefit of playing in a bar is that the crowd seems more conducive to sing alongs so it was probably the best crowd interaction of the Alberta shows I saw...even if they went 0/4 in the game. Despite a late start for the show PlasticSoldier, NonPopulus and my other friend went to have a post-show chat at a nearby bar. We were kicked out of there at 1AM and with a 5AM wake up I didn't have a chance to do any playback of my recording, start editing or call out a special moment or two from the night. Prior to MG taking the stage I noticed I had about 2h left of storage space on my recording device and in my haste I was purging older files and deleted the VIP Experience recording before I even had a chance to play it back or offload it. This was pretty crushing as it appears that the VIP Experience is my Kryptonite as I had a technical problem at the Calgary 2017 one so I guess I have to try a third time to see if I can correct my wrongs. Look for a song sample from the Edmonton show later this weekend (I am heading to Banff tonight but should have a chance to edit material) and possibly other musings that come to me while listening back to the show.
  30. 3 points
    We had a celebration of life gathering for him on Wednesday. The whole community, friends, co-workers and family came out. Hundreds of people came and went. It was nice. Here is the Eulogy and speech I wrote for him (forgive the grammar mistakes): Henry was my only son. I wasn’t as close to him as he was with his mother. We didn’t have the same kind of relationship. However, I could see as he was getting older, that he was starting to show interest in spending time with me. Just a few weeks ago I began teaching him how to play Chess. He loved it, and I could see it was something he could accel at. We did spend lots of time together, over the years, playing video games, watching movies, going to the Sault etc; but he had his own interests, and he had his own routine that he liked to follow. I took him fishing for the first time the summer before last. He really enjoyed that, (we went a few times) and he would often ask me when we were going to go again. “Next summer son...” I told him. He was really looking forward to it, and so was I. It’s only been over the past year that I’ve really come to understand my son. Why he liked the things he liked, why he did the things he did, the way he did them, and how he did them. I was hard on him for a long time. I wanted my son to be a responsible adult when he grew up and I had high standards for discipline and behavior. But most importantly, I wanted my son to know that Jesus was his Lord and Savior. It was often a struggle for me, to communicate with my son. My wife understood him better than I, and tried very hard to help me understand him. I was bull headed and stubborn and it took a long time. I wasn’t good at bending. Eventually though, I came to understand him better, but I give my wife all of the credit. Henry’s death was very sudden and unexpected. His illness came out of nowhere. My wife stayed with him the whole time, keeping his spirits up, encouraging him and keeping him from being afraid. She stayed with him until the very end. She was strong for him. I will always remember that for the rest of my life. There was a point during this process where Henry asked my wife “Mom, am I going to die?” and she responded “You might die, but the doctors are going to do everything they can to make sure it doesn’t happen, but if you do, you know where you are going, so you don’t have to be afraid." Psalm 139:13-16 says “For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was made in the secret place, when I was woven together in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed body; All the days ordained for me were written in your book before one of them came to be.” See.. God knew what Henry was going to be like before he was born. God knew what kind of mother and father he needed to help him through life and death. God chose my wife and I to be his parents, and we were very blessed. God laid everything out before us and took care of us. He took care of Henry and our family during this most difficult of times, and he continues too. Henry knew where he was going. I take great comfort in knowing that the last face he saw before going to sleep was his mother, and the next face he saw was Jesus Christ. I want to thank everyone for their support over the past few weeks. We are very grateful for everything everyone has done for us and for the prayers. We know you loved our Henry. Most importantly, I want to thank God for helping us, for being there for my only son Henry. He knows how I feel, because he lost a son once too.
  31. 3 points
    Here's some photo's of him throughout his childhood. Oh yes and I forgot to mention... when Chaotic Neutral came out and I listened to it in the Van, he loved "Army of Lions" and would ask me to play it if I was listening to Matthew Good while driving. So now that song will always remind of him.
  32. 3 points
    Also he is apparently working on Change of Season to add in as the tour goes on, which if he does play it will be the first time in over twenty years I believe, so pretty cool to see some of the ideas hes kicking around for this tour. Should also mention that I bought a ticket for my friend to attend the final stop on the tour in Vancouver and like he did on the BM tour he will record and film the entire concert.
  33. 3 points
    As sad as I am about this, I was also upset when I went back to re-read my interactions with her on here - and discovered that all of her posts were gone. This is the last time I'll make a big deal about this, but people, including any admins, should not have the power to wipe out entire post histories, with the exception of troll and spam accounts. And this is precisely why - they're the record of our interactions - they're our memories. We already lose so much that we know and remember about people when they're no longer with us. (PS: I'm assuming the deletions must have happened some time ago.)
  34. 3 points
    She was a fixture at every Matt Good concert I'd ever attended in Vancouver. She had one of those larger than life personalities that you couldn't help, but notice her there. Often Matt would single her out in the crowd and sometimes have a brief chat. She was obviously a huge life long fan. Recently she had moved to Victoria and it was strange on the Beautiful Midnight Revisted tour to attend those shows and not notice her at the show. Obviously she was a member of this forum as well and it's tragic to think she is gone so young. Pretty cool for Matt to offer a tribute for her.
  35. 3 points
    He’s back. Commenting is disabled. For the best for now I think.
  36. 3 points
    I used to blog and tweet about Quebec politics and social issues and stopped largely because of all the anger I received. At some point, the hatred online becomes vicious and violent and it's hard to just stand up and not let trolls win. I've had several "Ahh fuck that shit" moments when I torched my Twitter account completely and came back months later (I've had 3 or 4 different Twitter accounts since 2010) in the last decade because of that. Now, when I tweet, I talk about tech and no one bothers me anymore. For a celebrity like Matt, it's much worst than my experience because of the sheer number of people who know who he is. He's always been very direct and honest in what he thinks even if it's not the popular opinion. So in that respect, I'm sure we can't begin to fathom the amount and the ferocity of the comments he probably endured before doing this. Chris I completely understand what you mean but you have to keep in mind all the things we don't know. I hope he comes back but I can completely understand him going "fuck it". If he's not happy using social media, then it's better he doesn't.
  37. 3 points
    "symbolistic white vinyl"
  38. 2 points
    Utopia Parkway Studios closed it's doors in 2004 after 12 years in business. I had a tape and tracksheet vault in Studio B so it went home with me. You have to remember, it was 1995, and neither of us had internet. So we would talk on the phone, and notes would be made. Ideas would be floated. I was surprised to find the tracksheet for AMR because I assumed it went to Toronto, or L.A., but I must have dubbed the tapes and copied the tracksheet (just in case) and sent them. This is quite common. Pre the digital recording age, which started to become more predominant in the mid 1990's with the first ProTools DSP rigs, multi-track tapes would be copied from machine to machine, so in case the orginal master got degraded from use, they had the backup. In this case, using digital tape, it was just a matter of cloning from tape to tape. So Alabama Motel Room was a watershed song, and the songs that were born after it sealed the deal. You can note the sessions were like chunks of time, in which we'd start all over again, literally from the ground up, drum beds, bass, overdubs, mixing. That's why you'll notice a difference in tonality and production. The LOTGA songs are from destinct time periods: (See Graphic) The songs from the previous band lineup (Lost Album) were eventually all on the B list.
  39. 2 points
    Great to have you here John! Any time we can hear stories about any aspect of Matt's career from someone who was there first hand it is always greatly appreciated. As you can imagine over the years so many stories have gotten mixed up or details crossed and so any time someone can set the record straight so to speak it's of immense value to the group here. And of course there are I imagine so many stories and details that just simply haven't been made widely available to people outside the small group of people involved in the creation of the music, so I'm sure you have a great deal to share that would be a revelation to us here. Especially in the early days of the band so much remains unknown to the fanbase at large. Before the days where MGB were basically the MUCH MUSIC house band, there simply wasn't much ever discussed online about that era, leaving many of us fans (most of whom became fans during the Underdogs era and later) to speculate without much fact to base that speculation upon, even things as simple as release dates of the albums and EP's from that era aren't something set in stone. So welcome to the forums, I'm sure I speak for everyone when I say it's great to have you here and I very much look forward to anything you share! Hard to believe Alabama Motel Room is 25 years old. I remember buying the In a Coma greatest hits compilation in 2005 and thinking the Ghetto tracks on it were 10 years old at that time and thinking it seemed like an entire lifetime ago haha.
  40. 2 points
    I read through em all and found out some interesting things: 1) Matt was inspired to write Deep Six after watching a Noel Gallagher interview: "He was going on about how rock 'n' roll shouldn't mean anything and how you shouldn't really try to say anything. And I was thinking, well, that's pretty weak, but whatever, he's got his f---ing point of view, right? And then he starts going on about how the world's a great place and we're all having a good time. And then I just sat up and said, `Do you wake up on the same planet I do? Why don't you f---ing flip over to CNN and check it out?' That's where I got the line, `I don't know where you think you are.' " 2) Matt was inspired to write Automatic after watching a show on liposuction: "I was watching some show about how this woman had to get this (stuff) sucked out of her hips so she could fit into her dress to go to an opera," says Good. "It's a song about how things are so accessible. People used to worry about things like making sure there was gas in the truck so they could drive their wares to market and now they're worried about getting a new nose. And I find that pathetic." 3) Matt played violin from age 3 to 14. 4) Matt wrote 52 songs for Beautiful Midnight. 5) Matt said Carmelina was "too bass-y". 6) In 2002, Gordie Johnson of Big Sugar called Matt “Matt Average” and then said this: "I don't want to slag the guy, because his music is really good. But why does he have to be such an idiot? Matthew Good is a twerp. He is not nice to anybody. He's nasty to his fans, he's nasty to the press, he's nasty to the record label, he's nasty to the guys in his band. Wake up! You're Matthew Good. You are not Matthew The Great. You're just good." And this is a guy who toured with Matt just a few years before. There's more interesting stuff you may not have known or have forgotten. Here's the link: https://web.archive.org/web/20041012103943/http://www.canoe.com/JamMusicArtistsG/good_matthew.html
  41. 2 points
    I hadn't heard from Travis in over a month and after having called the Langley hospital earlier this week without any results I came across this online tonight. https://www.bclocalnews.com/obituaries/travis-jeremy-simons/ Username: Barfnuts I'll have to ask everyone's forgiveness for the length of this since I've never written one of these for a Bored member here and I've always sucked at keeping things short. Most of you didn't know Travis on account of him just starting to post here this past November, but me and Adam had the honest pleasure of meeting him this past January in his own town of Langley. He was the gentleman who interviewed Matt after his hometown show in Coquitlam back in May of 1998. Right after that he put together/narrated this little segment for Roger's Cable despite only being 18 years old at the time: 21 years later after finding Adam's thread here about rare MGB videos, he would find the material he had from that night, convert it to digital, and share a bit of it with us on The Bored here just to be kind since so many of us were asking him how much other footage of the concert he still had. It's a wonderful video and made a lot of us exceptionally happy to see. He was also a super talented musician who never quite had the breaks he was looking for, but regardless always loved creating: It's funny...not much more than a month ago we were discussing how so many people who grew up on MGB would go onto to become musicians themselves and I can't help but think Travis would have included himself in that category to one degree or another since he always said MGB was a huge influence for him. Anyways, regardless of the short time period I knew him, through the many things we discussed online here- and the evening myself and Adam spent hanging out with the guy that I will never forget- I can say without hesitancy that he was a good person, who had a decent/kind soul, and lived by an honest/worthwhile set of morals. I'm extremely grateful for the time I had to know him and will miss him a hell of a lot. Thanks for reading.
  42. 2 points
    I didn't know him well but he messaged me and thanked me for my contributions to the site. He felt bad he couldn't share his video with me and told me if I'm ever in Canada he would love to have me come up and see it. I was floored by his generosity and saddened that I won't have the chance to meet him. I read his obituary and he looked like a great guy that left us far too soon. RIP Travis
  43. 2 points
    I really enjoyed the first episode. However, my opinion is basically this. It is a good show, but its not "star trek" or not good "star trek". Star Trek is supposed to be bright, altruistic, humans have evolved etc;. This is like a slap in the face to what Star Trek was. This kind of stuff is good for alternate reality type episodes but I think they are trying to build on some future where the Federation collapses. They are basically making people act like 21st century humans and it's annoying. Its not Star Trek and I'm not a troll for thinking or saying it. The inmates are running the asylum. People are also writing for the show who don't know anything about Star Trek, there is no effort like in the previous series to try and pay tribute to Gene's vision.
  44. 2 points
    Damn that was stressful. I intended to book VIP for Buffalo, with thoughts of possibly doing Kitchener depending on the cost, thinking I might add it on in the next few weeks. I had the page for each show pulled up on the computer and at 10 the Buffalo VIP link was not working. At all. I went to the venue page and they had nothing either. Naturally, I panicked. So I went to the kitchener show page and it redirected me to sound rink for VIP just fine. So I said to myself well I guess maybe VIP is not available for Buffalo and that sucks but oh well and proceeded to check out for Kitchener instead. I get to the payment page and because I’m on my work computer, my paypal is not autosaved and I can’t login to save my life. So I try to check out as a guest and when I put my card info in I get errors. I try a different card. Still errors. What in the fresh hell is this. I see my boss walking in my direction with a couple people on a tour of the company. Panic escalates and I peace out to the phone booth room with my phone and my credit cards in hand to go on my “ten minute break”. Once on mobile, I successfully login to PayPal and am able to secure the Kitchener VIP. Now that I am in sound rink I decide to search all the mg shows and lo and behold the buffalo date is on the list. With little hesitation I book VIP for it also. Because fuck it. So stressful. Thank you for listening to my live journal entry for today.
  45. 2 points
    I attended the show with PlasticSoldier and was really impressed with this being a festival performance. At these shows I expect the singles/bit hits but how they were put in to the set and surrounded by other non singles was great. The band played for over 90 minutes (went on at 10:30PM), it was overcast, windy and cold but that didn't deter them as they put on a solid set. When you realize this is the first band performance of the year you would expect there to be some rust but it didn't come up. MG may have missed a lyric or two but we're probably all a bit fatigued when coming back from vacation :). MG also removed his shoes during the encore because he got a blister, perhaps the Italian footwear needs a little more break in time. The Beautiful Midnight Revisited tour did exactly what I wanted as I wished to get b-sides in to the main set and with Boy And His Machine Gun and Born to Kill making an appearance I was a happy camper (I also love Future is X-Rated, but it's slightly more common than the others). As Rhu8ar8Pi3 mentioned the Let's Get It On inclusion was a pleasant surprise and I also questioned myself if I heard the opening chords correctly too. I really enjoy how this song was re-recorded and it is a thrill to hear live. Adam_777 will appreciate this...MG referenced playing the ending of In a World Called Catastrophe across a highway. And that was it. He acknowledged the song but didn't play it. Maybe next time. Unless NonPopulus surprised us and attended the show I don't think there will be a multi-source edit of the show so I went ahead and tracked mine out. You can check out a song sample here: https://soundcloud.com/sean-gursky/matthew-good-decades-june-21-2019.
  46. 2 points
    It's wonderful that decades can go by and it's still possible to unearth a treasure like this. The amount of effort to obtain this from the Lloyd family and digitize it is no small feat and a gigantic thank you to everyone involved. This is a gem for all of us, and as MG said in the "Sharks of Downtown" video, he created classic rock of the future and here we are.
  47. 2 points
    I just got back from the Sidney show. I'm not going to go on in a lot of detail, I'm not really sure what to say. Amazing. I've been waiting over 10 years to see Matt play acoustically and it was even better than I expected. I've seen him with the band 7 times before this, not to take anything away from the band, but this is definitely my favourite show I've seen. There was tons of between-song banter (between all the songs), lots of hilarious moments. Matt's show was about 2 hours 10 minutes. It felt like a very personal performance, the venue only has 8 rows of seats. Amazing, I don't know what else to say. I'll take my best stab at the setlist. The beginning and the encore will be correct, the rest will be completely out of order, and there may be some I forget: Fearless Sort of a Protest Song Prime Time Deliverance Born Losers *Unknown New Song* While We Were Hunting Rabbits Tripoli Fated The Fine Art of Falling Apart Alert Status Red Load Me Up Los Alamos Apparitions Strange Days Men At The Door 99% of Us is Failure I don't think I forgot any, but I may have, I quickly scrolled through the album tracklists to try to remember all that was played. Like I said, order is way wrong in the middle. The new song was awesome, not sure if it was ever posted as a demo. The most memorable lyrics were "Once you break it you've bought it, and once you've bought it, it's breakable" (hope I got that right). Oh, some other interesting information we got about the next album: - The working title of the album is currently "Moving Walls", it sounded like that's what Matt wants to call it - There are 16 songs, only 1 has electric guitar - It will be recorded in studio after this tour I still have the Campbell River and Victoria shows to go.
  48. 2 points
    I had a message board for a while too (before my hosting messed up and lost the database a few too many times), as did Prime Time Deliverance. PTD had a lot of us who didn't feel like we fit in with groups on Running For Home's board. After PTD wasn't around, I had my board, The Double Life, for a while. MGB during the AOB days linked to Running For Home's board (the APA [Amusement Park Accident]). Nation Of Cool had an official board, was that the Metro?. the official MG.org site had an official board on and off too. There's been so many it's hard to keep track. I'm sure Whorrible and other pre-Running For Home sites had some too. but man was that forever ago to remember considering my site itself is 18 years old
  49. 2 points
    Oh, you were totally fine. I actually prefer that kind of discussion - I'd rather someone be vocal about how they feel and make me rethink my opinion. I did social media for a major label band (who most of you would know) for a number of years, and, if my client had done this, I would have removed the links from the website myself once I knew that they were dead. The last thing I want from a PR standpoint is for people to follow those dead urls, especially if it were possible that someone else could scoop up the usernames on those accounts. Not to say that it wasn't endorsed or approved in this case - but it wouldn't have to be. That's actually what was good about our discussion. I'll freely admit that my initial reaction was: "Ugh, not this shit again." The NF deletion hit close to home as someone who spent years running message boards, and I'm (obviously) still a bit fired up about it. So it's good to have the pushback from those who see it differently. I'll say this: I'm definitely concerned for him, not knowing what's going on. But, to me, that's also part of the problem. A simple note from his team ("Matt's decided to take a break from his social media accounts to give himself time to recover from the recent tour with OLP and to get himself ready for the upcoming summer tour dates, but he wants everyone to know that he's fine.") would have knocked most of this discussion down. Instead, everyone's hand-wringing for the not-knowing.
  50. 2 points
    Yeah, I was the one taking you to task on the FB page. Sorry, Chris, I want to assert that I respectfully disagree with your position and only respond to you with such zeal because I think we all care about Matt and want him to be okay. I'll repeat my remarks for posterity here: As much as I agree that historically he has indeed reacted to certain comments with anger, I did see the comments that were posted on his Instagram before he removed everything. This is much different. The person in question was brazenly and destructively making personal comments and speculation to the point that ANY logical person might've been turned off by social media as a result. I will absolutely not reproduce them here because they were disgusting beyond words. Again, deleting his interactions with us here or in other locales I don't think suggests that he did not care about those interactions. In fact, when he left here, he sent a statement to Anton that spoke positively about the beneficial aspects of being apart of this community. Matt has been more accessible than artists typically are over the years, and unfortunately this has opened him up to those who would exploit that for attention or to get a rise out of him. We absolutely have no entitlement to personal interaction from him; that I myself have sent him private messages on social media and he has responded to me personally, for instance, is something that I will always cherish no matter what has happened. Matt is the most important artist in my life, and he always will be. I think it's up to us, as his die hard fans, to stand behind him during this difficult time, context be damned. I miss his presence here, and if he chooses to minimize his social media presence in the future, I will miss that, as well. But I have his music, and I have the twenty plus shows I have been to, and I have the remarkably positive interactions from him when he was around. And I have the overwhelmingly positive experience of being apart of this fan community; that, while we can disagree as to the form or motivations of Matt's newfound absence from social media, the reason we're even talking about it is just because we just want him to be okay. We care about him. And he deserves it.
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