Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
IamNick

What Are You Currently Reading?

Recommended Posts

(not sure if there was already a topic like this, did a few searches but nothing came up!)

 

I started reading Infinite Jest recently when I saw that Jason Segel is going to be in a movie about the author. I'm really enjoying it so far, that opening chapter is really good!

 

I actually bought the book about 5 years ago but never got around to reading it and then started travelling for a few years and it's so huge I didn't really have room for it in my luggage haha.

 

I've actually got about 10 or so books that I bought that I need to read, + I need to read book 5 of A Song of Ice and Fire before I watch any of season 5 of Game of Thrones, oof I've got a huge backlog of books to read!

 

Anyone else reading anything good, or bad? Any recommendations?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started reading Atlas Shrugged a few years ago but only made it about a quarter of the way through before I stopped. I don't know lol, maybe I'll give it another try one day, but I just wasn't super into it at the time. Haven't touched Anthem, how does it compare to Atlas Shrugged?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re-reading A Song of Ice and Fire (currently reading A Clash of Kings) but REALLY want to read A Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers and Ancillary Mercy (when it comes out) by Anne Leckie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just quit reading last exit to brooklyn when i was almost done, because i thought it was shit, no matter what hubert selby's rep as a writer is.

 

now half way through the bat by jo nesbo. s'alright.

 

salman rushdie's new book is next in queue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey!  I'm new to the forum, so I don't know if it is too late to add in my 2 cents about books.  Please let me know if I am wrong to revive this conversation.

 

I'm an avid reader of fiction & non-fiction, reading about a book a week:  so many that I have to keep track so that I don't re-buy books I've read in the past & forgotten about, lol!

 

Here's my top 5 reads of 2015 with brief breakdowns for anyone who might be interested:

1.  The Wind Up Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi-This is my new author gem of the year.  This book captured me from the word go.  He has a book of short stories, 2 adult novels and several kids books.  I have read all but the Water Knife which is his most recent release.  A word to the wise:  The Wind Up Girl, in particular, comes with it the danger of being up into the wee hours of the night reading.  Paolo, himself hesitates to place his work in any category, though I have found his books in the sci-fi section.  It's not really sci-fi though, it's more tales of an alternate reality, or possible future.  They are enthrallying, nonetheless:  I shan't say more for fear of ruining it's appeal.  If you only read one off of this list, read this one!

 

2.  The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce-I read this one at the request of a friend whose tastes are far less adventurous than my own, and ended up loving it!  It's about a gentleman who gets a letter from an old friend, writes her back and then, on his way to post the letter, decides to deliver it by hand, which requires walking halfway across England.  He is totally unprepared for the journey in every way.  The charm in this one, is the self reflexive tone of the novel, alongside the Brit humour.

 

3.  Another Roadside Attraction by Tom Robbins-I've been a Tom Robbins fan for years, though I somehow missed this one until recently.  It centres around a decrepit roadside attraction featuring a flea circus & 2 hippies.  They end up becoming host to the body of Christ, which has been lifted from the Vatican by a friend of theirs, who had been posing as a priest.  It's not for the faint of heart, so enter at your own risk:  Tom Robbins is a social satirist whose point of view tends decidedly towards the obscure.  My advice?  If you decide to crack the spine of this one, hang on for dear life & endeavour your best to enjoy the ride!

 

4.  Manufacturing Consent by Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman-  This is a heavy non-fiction read which was published in the 1980's.  Noam is a linguist, psychologist and social theorist who is known the world over.  I have studied him in University from each point of view over the years and find him to be brilliant.  This is not an easy read, as the two authors are incredibly detailed in their analysis of the manner in which politics & big business contribute to the dissemination of news media.  They break down in detail what was reported in the news, comparing it against actual events in the areas of the world discussed; much of which has come to light in retrospect.  The strength of this book lies in it's ability to help the reader become more critical in the way they view news media.  While the information is dated, much of what they discuss is still pertinent in this day in age, as it sheds light on the manner in which we are taught to view the world around us.  I highly recommend it for anyone who is interested in becoming more critical in their thought patterns, as well as for anyone who is interested in finding out more about central america and south east asia in the 50's and 60's. 

 

5.The Girl Who Was Saturday Night by Heather O'Neill-This book is a little piece of Canadiana, telling the tale of a set of twins, born and bred in Montreal.  Their father was a famous figure in Quebec, who impregnated a young woman.  Her family decided this was not acceptable, and so the twins were left to be raised by their grandfather who, you come to realise, lives with symptoms of undiagnosed mental illness.  This becomes important, as it contributes to an understanding of how the twins got to the point at which the reader first meets them, at the age of 19.  They are in the process of coming to terms with their burgeoning adulthood in the hotbed of 1990's Pro Quebec sentiments.  I loved this book from start to finish.  I have another of her books waiting patiently on my shelf, waiting for it's turn to shine!

 

In closing, I would like to add that I would be interested in sharing reads, if ever anyone is interested.  I have a few in mind which might be fun for a collective read, the first of which is Malcolm Lowry's "Under The Volcano".  He is a new author for me.  I'm testing him out on the mid-concert recommendation given my Mr. Good himself, which you have likely heard mid-Massey Hall recording.

 

Cheers & Happy Monday!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished the Witcher series of books by Andrzej Sapkowski. I had to go online to find translations for half the books in this series since it is of Polish origins. Many of you may know this name by the Witcher series of video games, but to me, the books are WAY better! I love the character development and the world Sapkowski paints in these novels and short stories. And the best parts of the book are with Geralt (the Witcher) and Yennefer. Reminds me of my wife and I so much. But anyway, the best part of the books are the dialogue. It feels like you are there with them rather than just reading about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for sharing these recommendations! I am a huge reader (by that I mean I read a lot, not that I'm huge though I'm not small) and I'm currently reading Captain Corelli's Mandolin and will read Bel Canto by Ann Patchett next. And all the ones you have recommended will be added to the list!

 

My favourite reads of 2015 are The Stranger, The Plague and The Fall by Albert Camus. I can't even explain how much these books affected me.

 

My other favourite books overall are His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman and We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver and Room by Emma Donoghue.

 

I am a writer myself (poetry, short fiction and a novel I can't seem to make progress on) and I sometimes get intimidated by the greatness of other authors which leads me to doubt myself and not write, so I read much less than I used to.

 

I send my thanks back at you!  I will add those to my Amazon cart (which currently threatens to topple the internet, with it's size, lol!)

 

I have no aspirations to be a novelist, so I can't comment on your particular sentiments.  I am, however, acquainted with how difficult it can be to have something which is so loved, compromised by that which is so desired.  I recognise this to be a very difficult position for a person to experience, and empathise with the position you are in. 

 

I wish you all the best, in your journey, and will keep my eyes peeled for your work on the forum. 

Just finished the Witcher series of books by Andrzej Sapkowski. I had to go online to find translations for half the books in this series since it is of Polish origins. Many of you may know this name by the Witcher series of video games, but to me, the books are WAY better! I love the character development and the world Sapkowski paints in these novels and short stories. And the best parts of the book are with Geralt (the Witcher) and Yennefer. Reminds me of my wife and I so much. But anyway, the best part of the books are the dialogue. It feels like you are there with them rather than just reading about it.

 

Thank you for this recommendation!  I love the personal story attached to your love of the series.   It contributes to my desire to take a crack at these ones, for sure :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going back and forth between a few...

A History of God by Karen Armstrong (just started, no comment yet)
 

Children of Monsters: An Inquiry into the Sons and Daughters of Dictators by Jay Nordlinger...interesting so far, and yet too much speculation at times.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm going back and forth between a few...

 

A History of God by Karen Armstrong (just started, no comment yet)

 

Children of Monsters: An Inquiry into the Sons and Daughters of Dictators by Jay Nordlinger...interesting so far, and yet too much speculation at times.

 

 

Those both sound like fascinating reads!  I'll give'em a look.

 

I just stumbled across a book called "Reasons To Stay Alive" by Matt Haig.  I've read one of his other books (The Humans) and loved it, so I picked it up.  It turns out it's about the author's time living with depression & anxiety.  It's a pretty spot on account of what it's like to struggle with mental illness, so far.  It looks as though there is a 'movement' of some form attached to it as well:  he's got hashtags of different people's reasons to stay alive all over the inside book covers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those both sound like fascinating reads!  I'll give'em a look.

 

I just stumbled across a book called "Reasons To Stay Alive" by Matt Haig.  I've read one of his other books (The Humans) and loved it, so I picked it up.  It turns out it's about the author's time living with depression & anxiety.  It's a pretty spot on account of what it's like to struggle with mental illness, so far.  It looks as though there is a 'movement' of some form attached to it as well:  he's got hashtags of different people's reasons to stay alive all over the inside book covers.

That sounds very interesting. I'll have to read that one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished up a couple over the last few days: 

 

1)  A Million Little Pieces by James Frey-It is presented as a personal account of a drug & alcohol addicts journey through recovery.  Apparently there was a big brouhaha over this when it was discovered that the story was more fiction, than fact.  It's still an interesting read stylistically as he uses very minimal punctuation. I really love books in which the binding, typeset & general presentation are interesting and representative of the content, which is the case with this book. 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami is a great example of this, as well.

 

2) Brain On Fire by Susannah Cahalan-This is about a woman who, at the age of 24, starts developing symptoms of psychosis & seizures, with no prior history of either.  It is an account of her "month of madness", which actually ends up being more like a year of her life from initial symptoms, through to recovery.  I read this one in less than 24hrs, so make sure you have time to set aside if you pick it up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those both sound like fascinating reads!  I'll give'em a look.

 

I just stumbled across a book called "Reasons To Stay Alive" by Matt Haig.  I've read one of his other books (The Humans) and loved it, so I picked it up.  It turns out it's about the author's time living with depression & anxiety.  It's a pretty spot on account of what it's like to struggle with mental illness, so far.  It looks as though there is a 'movement' of some form attached to it as well:  he's got hashtags of different people's reasons to stay alive all over the inside book covers.

So, I did go out and buy this book. I haven't rapturously consumed a book like I did this one in years.

 

On almost every page, I felt like I was reading snippets from my own life being published for all to see. Absolutely fantastic, beautiful words.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually re-read Weapon X (Wolverine graphic novel) by Barry Windsor-Smith. I love his art work and back story of Wolverine. That series of comics is what got me really into comic books back in the 90s. I haven't read a new comic since the "Death Of Wolverine" series was released. Anyway, love me some Weapon X!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest girl

I just stumbled across a book called "Reasons To Stay Alive" by Matt Haig.  I've read one of his other books (The Humans) and loved it, so I picked it up.  It turns out it's about the author's time living with depression & anxiety.  It's a pretty spot on account of what it's like to struggle with mental illness, so far.  It looks as though there is a 'movement' of some form attached to it as well:  he's got hashtags of different people's reasons to stay alive all over the inside book covers.

 

So, I did go out and buy this book. I haven't rapturously consumed a book like I did this one in years.

 

On almost every page, I felt like I was reading snippets from my own life being published for all to see. Absolutely fantastic, beautiful words.

 

You guys make me want to read this book. I know someone who is going through it. I will pick it up at Indigo this week. Thanks for telling me about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I did go out and buy this book. I haven't rapturously consumed a book like I did this one in years.

 

On almost every page, I felt like I was reading snippets from my own life being published for all to see. Absolutely fantastic, beautiful words.

 

I'm so glad that you enjoyed this book!  I find part of it's appeal is that he is very direct in his manner of writing, which allows the truth of his experience to shine through. 

 

I'll keep you posted on any others I find that may deal with similar subject matter.  I have personal experience with mental illness, and now work in the field which contributes to the manner in which I am attracted to books about mental health.

 

You guys make me want to read this book. I know someone who is going through it. I will pick it up at Indigo this week. Thanks for telling me about it.

 

I look forward to hearing what you think! 

 

FYI-The other book I read by Matt Haig ('The Humans') does feature a character who is living with depression.  I remember thinking that this character was quite well written, and now understand why he was able to create such a three dimensional character.

 

I went backwards and read "Invitation to the Game" by Monica Hughes recently, which I read and loved as a teeny bopper.  Many of my nieces and nephews are in around that age group now, so I'm finding myself heading back into my old favourites.

 

I'm just about to crack "Great House" by Nicole Krauss.  It is my book club book (meeting next Sunday, yikes!), and I'm in charge of the questions:  wish me luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest girl

I'm so glad that you enjoyed this book!  I find part of it's appeal is that he is very direct in his manner of writing, which allows the truth of his experience to shine through. 

 

I'll keep you posted on any others I find that may deal with similar subject matter.  I have personal experience with mental illness, and now work in the field which contributes to the manner in which I am attracted to books about mental health.

 

 

I look forward to hearing what you think! 

 

FYI-The other book I read by Matt Haig ('The Humans') does feature a character who is living with depression.  I remember thinking that this character was quite well written, and now understand why he was able to create such a three dimensional character.

 

I went backwards and read "Invitation to the Game" by Monica Hughes recently, which I read and loved as a teeny bopper.  Many of my nieces and nephews are in around that age group now, so I'm finding myself heading back into my old favourites.

 

I'm just about to crack "Great House" by Nicole Krauss.  It is my book club book (meeting next Sunday, yikes!), and I'm in charge of the questions:  wish me luck!

Cool. If enjoy the book, I will try 'The Humans' next. Good luck with the book club!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2) Brain On Fire by Susannah Cahalan-This is about a woman who, at the age of 24, starts developing symptoms of psychosis & seizures, with no prior history of either.  It is an account of her "month of madness", which actually ends up being more like a year of her life from initial symptoms, through to recovery.  I read this one in less than 24hrs, so make sure you have time to set aside if you pick it up!

 

Great book.  Definitely recommend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool. If enjoy the book, I will try 'The Humans' next. Good luck with the book club!!

 

Thanks for wishing my luck!  I got started on it last night, and was pulled into it pretty quickly.  I read it until I almost fell asleep on top of it, so I have faith that I can get it finished.

 

This passage, on Page 1, got me:

"Things got worse then for a while before they got better.  I won't go into it except to say that I didn't go out, not even to see my grandmother, and I didn't let anyone come to see me, either.  The only thing that helped, oddly, was the fact that the weather was stormy, and so I had to keep running around the apartment with the strange little brass wrench made especially for tightening the bolts on either side of the antique window frames-when they got loose in windy weather the windows would shriek.  There were six windows, and just as I finished tightening the bolts on one, another would start to howl, so I would run with the wrench, and then maybe I would have a half hour of silence on the only chair left in the apartment.  For a while, at least, it seemed that all there was of the world was that long rain and the need to keep the bolts fastened"-Nicole Krauss, Great House

 

This passage feels very authentic to me.  She is using this house as a metaphor for the bereavement process she is going through.  The foundation of her life is just as tenuous as the moorings of the windows in their frames; the screaming of the wind, an echo of that which threatens to escape from her soul. Her only way of coping is to focus on the bare minimum of upkeep, in an effort to get a few moments of peace here and there:  the rest of her life a blank slate.    

 

Great book.  Definitely recommend.

 

I'm glad to liked it!  Thank you for posting your thoughts :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so glad that you enjoyed this book!  I find part of it's appeal is that he is very direct in his manner of writing, which allows the truth of his experience to shine through. 

 

I'll keep you posted on any others I find that may deal with similar subject matter.  I have personal experience with mental illness, and now work in the field which contributes to the manner in which I am attracted to books about mental health.

 

 

I look forward to hearing what you think! 

 

FYI-The other book I read by Matt Haig ('The Humans') does feature a character who is living with depression.  I remember thinking that this character was quite well written, and now understand why he was able to create such a three dimensional character.

 

 

Thanks, please do! It is very direct, you're right. That's why it resonated so much. It's a completely unvarnished, not embarrassed look at what it's like to live with depression/panic. I just started "The Humans"

 

And Girl, do pick it up!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, please do! It is very direct, you're right. That's why it resonated so much. It's a completely unvarnished, not embarrassed look at what it's like to live with depression/panic. I just started "The Humans"

 

And Girl, do pick it up!

 

I look forward to hearing your thoughts on "The Humans".

 

Another one which I read last year, and almost made it to my top 5 is "A Man Called Ove" by Frederick Backman.  I don't want to say too much about it, as anything I say will kind of ruin the delightful unfoldment of the book's premise.  I will say that it is about community, and how important being surrounded by community can be for a person in pain.  I highly recommend this one as well!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was given Ready Player One to read by a buddy of mine.  It's being turned into a movie so I've got to hurry up and finish it, haha.
Unfortunately it was 'borrowed' from my workplace, so I've got to go pick up a new copy : /

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers. Holy shit this book is awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thomas Wolfe - Of Time and the RIver

 

One of the great unsung Southern writers that is most likely due to the lack of availability of most of his work combined with his absence from High School reading lists.

 

Admittedly an acquired taste, the man is to words what Mozart was to notes...if some is good, more is best!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reading Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil deGrasse Tyson. It's interesting, but very brief, and not very technical. It's making me want to re-read some of my university physics textbooks (only ever took a couple first year physics courses).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.