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Matt

What Are You Reading?

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Perestroika, by Mikhail Gorbachov. It's actually not too didactic or authoritarian in style, which is good. Unfortunately, because Gorbachov was still very much a product of the Soviet system, the book contains a number of propagandized historical references. And because it was published in 1987, I doubt he could be as open about the reform program as he'd like.

 

On the plus side, I got it at a book sale, and it only cost 25 cents.

 

Next on the list, "Annals of an Abiding Liberal", by John Kenneth Galbraith. Which I got at the same incredible book sale.

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Wow, Mrs. Jesus...you make me sound legendary. No one else here on that level but you. Simple answer, when I'm at home alone in the evenings, I'm writing. I've been churning out some of the most amazing stuff over the last month or so. I clocked in at 435 pages. I'm doing some loose editing and adjusting, because I'm a perfectionist...but I've already started work on the second book on the series.

 

What kind of subject matter do you write about? Genres etc?

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I've actually been writing for years. I just finished book one of my Scifi series, which is my baby. I've also got a police thriller set in Rhode Island, that I've been noodling with for several years. I've been toying with a angst/romance novel for awhile, and finally seem to be on a good track with it.

 

I've written several large volumes of poetry, and I'm waiting on a friend to become available to look over my notes on a period in my life, because I think it would make an interesting book.

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Reading the Bourne Legacy by Eric Van Lustbader. Despite the glaring plot hole that permeates the book, it's not a horrible read.

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Dawkins is definitely one of my favourite authors ever and his scientific insight and positioning on societal issues speaks to me very closely.

You know, I agree with Dawkins like 95% of the time, but him and Christopher Hitchens manage to be about as painfully annoying in their correctness as possible. I support his goals, but I feel like a little more evangelicalism and a little less smugness would get more people on his side.

 

And I'm 80% done Nobokov's Lolita. SO fantastic. It's creepy, touching, and makes you question the reality of 'love.' There are so many passages that just make your heart ache with romance and affection...and then you realize they're written by an old man to a 14 year old and it really fucks with you.

See, I never made it past the inherent hilarity of Humbert's character. Everything about him is so constantly ridiculous that it's hard to believe anybody but a 14 year old would be involved with him.

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I recently read a book called "Total Oblivion, More or Less" which was fucking fantastic. Currently reading "the Ninja Handbook" by the creators of the Ask a Ninja website, and I'll be starting No Country for Old Men pretty quick.

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I recently read a book called "Total Oblivion, More or Less" which was fucking fantastic. Currently reading "the Ninja Handbook" by the creators of the Ask a Ninja website, and I'll be starting No Country for Old Men pretty quick.

 

No Country for Old Men is great. The movie captured pretty much the entirety of the novel in a beautiful way, but McCarthy's writing is just so hard to beat. I don't think I really agree with the themes he's playing with, but I'm also not even 30. I'll give him another 20 years and see if I feel a bit different.

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The one thing I don't really like about his writing is his like of quotes when someone is speaking- it can make things a bit confusing at times. Really enjoying the book so far though, maybe even a bit more than I liked the Road.

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The Alaskan Bootlegger's Bible, i am going to learn how to make me some moonshine! well at least some bathtub gin.

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The one thing I don't really like about his writing is his like of quotes when someone is speaking- it can make things a bit confusing at times. Really enjoying the book so far though, maybe even a bit more than I liked the Road.

 

Ha, that's actually one of my favorite things. As somebody who sometimes has to fight to read prose and not skim to get to more dialogue, it demands a bit more attention from me. Jose Saramago (Blindness, The Cave) does it as well, or at least his translators do.

 

It always surprises me how his books stay so meaty in subtext while being almost breezy in readability. Guys got a death grip on plotting and pacing.

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It was different times man. He was handsome, made a decent living, and exuded intelligence. Humbert's character is what MAKES Lolita. I suggest giving it another go.

 

I'm actually reading a collection of Nabokov's short stories right now, and while there is the occasional dud, they are excellent on the whole.

 

I also just finished David Sedaris` When You Are Engulfed In Flames. Sedaris is my favourite humor writer, and if you're not averse to bursting out into laughter at unexpected and sometimes inappropriate times, he comes strongly recommended.

Edited by Prometheon

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I saw a couple of Sedaris books at HMV and am thinking of picking a couple up. Finished No Country for Old Men the other day, and if I recally correctly, the movie ended much more happily than the book does. I guess we will find out when I watch the movie again soon.

 

Picked up Ray Kurzeil's "The Age of Spiritual Machines" today, will start Tuesday probably.

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Did I just miss a conversation about Lolita? That's one of my favourite books. Just finished re-reading it about a month ago.

 

Owen's right, it's Humbert Humbert's humanity and upbringing, that really makes Lolita. It's funny, though, everyone I've spoken to, who's also read the book, are always so horrified when I say I identify and feel so sad for HH. I've always likened it a bit to Margaret Atwood's "Alias Grace", in terms of debate over who's guilty and not.

 

Right now, I'm reading "The Lovely Bones". I had dismissed it as shitty chicklit, but it's turning out pretty engaging.

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I forgot I was reading Cujo right now. The Age of Spiritual Machines will come after Cujo.

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Trace-face: I agree with you. I don't think Humbert is a "monster." In the end, SHE seduced HIM. Though yeah, the whole deal with the sleeping pills was fucked up. We all wrestle with our own personal demons. His personal demon just happened to be an affinity for young girls, and he chose to be that way even less so than an alcoholic chooses to drink.

 

I don't know. Humbert IS disgusting in many many places. But in the end, I pity rather than hate him.

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the dialectic of secularization - habermas & ratzinger

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Trace-face: I agree with you. I don't think Humbert is a "monster." In the end, SHE seduced HIM. Though yeah, the whole deal with the sleeping pills was fucked up. We all wrestle with our own personal demons. His personal demon just happened to be an affinity for young girls, and he chose to be that way even less so than an alcoholic chooses to drink.

 

I don't know. Humbert IS disgusting in many many places. But in the end, I pity rather than hate him.

 

Definitely. I always noticed that whenever he did anything "monsterly" it was always with a great wringing of hands. I could nearly feel the desperation he felt. Perhaps it's because I identify a little. Not with the affinity for young girls, but rather the desperate, aching need.

 

I acknowledge the argument my friend had, about Lolita's actions. She brings up a good point, that Lolita acted in the only way she could, in order to "take charge" of a situation where she's effectively helpless.

 

I do understand that, but at the same time, at the risk of being colloquial, she's such a spoiled little bitch ;) It's hard to see her as a victim.

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I'm reading Scar Tissue. The autobiography on Anthony Kiedis of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. It's a great read and has a lot of insight on the slippery slope of gaining sobriety.

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I'm reading The Basketball Diarys. I just finished reading Dexter By Design and Bloodletting and Meraculous Cures.

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The Five Love Languages - Gary Chapman

 

It's a very compelling book about the different ways you communicate love to one another, and how what may work for you may not work for your significant other.

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